Jun 092014
 

It’s been a true pleasure to be a part of Paul Kenny‘s working life over the last six years or so. To date, the cherry on the cake was being asked to make the edition prints for his upcoming book, Seaworks 1998-2013.

Over the years, regular readers of this blog will have become very familiar with Paul’s work. If you’d like a little reminder, type his name into the search box towards the top right.

Paul Kenny's Iona Sun for the luxury edition of Seaworks 1998-2013

‘Iona Sun’ for the luxury edition of ‘Seaworks 1998-2013′

Set for a release date on 15th June, Seaworks 1998-2013 is being published in three forms by Triplekite Publishing — the standard book, a Special Edition and a Luxury Edition.

The Special and Luxury editions contain prints that are signed, numbered and embossed by Paul. To cap it off, the book is introduced by one of the finest writers on photography, Francis Hodgson.

I understand that pre-ordering of these editions has been brisk to say the least. If you’re a Paul Kenny fan, this is the ideal time to stake your claim to a copy of his beautiful book.

You might be aware of the prices Paul’s work commands at Beetles+Huxley in London, in which case you’ll also realise that this is a great chance to acquire two very accessibly-priced prints.

Printing Paul Kenny's Along The Strandline No.1 for Seaworks 1998-2013

‘Along The Strandline No.1′ for the special edition of ‘Seaworks 1998-2013′

“The work, building on themes developed over thirty-five years, tries to find the awe-inspiring in that which is easily passed by. It contains issues of fragility, beauty and transience in the landscape: marks and scars left by man and the potential threat to the few remaining areas of wilderness. Looking at the micro and thinking about the macro, I aim for each print to be a beautiful, irresistible, thought provoking object.” — Paul Kenny

Printing Paul Kenny's Along The Strandline No.1 and Iona Sun for Seaworks 1998-2013

‘Along The Strandline No.1′ and ‘Iona Sun’ for the luxury edition of ‘Seaworks 1998-2013′

Printing Paul Kenny's Along The Strandline No.1 for Seaworks 1998-2013

In progress — ‘Along The Strandline No.1′

Along the Strandline No.1 and Iona Sun are made as Archival Pigment Prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm using HP Vivera Pigment Ink.

Paul Kenny Seaworks 1998-2013

Click here to visit Triplekite Publishing and order your copy…

Sep 122013
 

One of the joys of 2013 has been meeting and working with the acclaimed photojournalist, Tom Stoddart.

As his site describes:

“During a long and varied career Tom has witnessed such international events as the war in Lebanon, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the election of President Nelson Mandela, the bloody siege of Sarajevo and the wars against Saddam Hussein in Iraq.”

On meeting for the first time, I couldn’t help but think that the clinical environment of my studio was surely at odds with many of those frightening, desperately upsetting scenes to have passed before Tom’s eyes.

When he calls to let me know that a photograph is on its way for me to print, it’s hard to know exactly what will appear on my monitor — especially when the file is entitled ‘Cool Dude’.

So, what will a photograph by Tom Stoddart be like that’s called ‘Cool Dude’?

Well, it’ll be like this:

Colombian coca cartel wars captured by Tom Stoddart

Colombia, Photograph © Tom Stoddart 1996

A striking image and one with an equally striking story:

COLOMBIA – NOVEMBER 1996:  Cocaine is worth billions of dollars to the Colombian drug traffickers. More than 70,000 people have died in the cartel wars, and Colombia’s elite Special Forces have battled hard to stem the flow of drugs from the jungle region of Guaviare which covers an area of 26,000 sq miles and produces more than half the world’s cocaine.  The photograph shows Special Forces after blowing up a landing strip used by cartels to transport cocaine from a coca-processing lab in the heart of the Colombian jungle.

Tom candidly told me about another facet to this photograph:

Having flown in by helicopter, a 4×4 vehicle belonging to the cartel was found nestled in the bushes. Unusually, the Special Forces decided to try and drive it back to the Police station some 100km away.

So, Tom now had the choice of returning by car or helicopter.

He chose the latter, which was fortunate as the 4×4 was ambushed en route. One of the Special Forces’ men was killed, the others were wounded but survived…

iWitness by Tom Stoddart

Tom has kindly given me a copy of his stunning book, iWITNESS.

Published by Trolley, printed in Italy and with a foreword by Sir Bob Geldof, it’s a beautifully produced tome full of anguish, sadness, desperation, horror, hope and optimism.

As Tom said when he handed it to me, “It’s just so sad that images like this even have to exist.”

Aug 242012
 

In this, our Olympic year, the world has witnessed an extraordinary multi-cultural spectacle in the London Games.

For most, I’m sure, it has been joyous, exciting and fascinating to see so many people from so many diverse walks of life meet for one huge event.

As you may have read earlier in the year, I have had a small part to play in the Olympics too.  However, I have also been working on the culmination of another huge multi-cultural project — Julian Germain’s Classroom Portraits.

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Julian Germain | Classroom Portraits | Kuramo Junior, Nigeria

I have worked with Julian on this project for seven years — scanning and printing some 200 images selected from the 500 or so made.

Largely commissioned by The British Council, this body of work has now become a huge documentation of the world’s youth in their schools around the globe.

Over the last few months, I have really enjoyed preparing many of these photographs for Julian’s major show The Future Is Ours at Nederlands Fotomuseum and for the accompanying book, Classroom Portraits published by Prestel.

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Peru

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Over the years, so many discussions have arisen in the making of these photographs.

In preparing this article, I posed a question to Julian:

“In your preface to the book Classroom Portraits, you describe the seemingly magical moment where ‘you are waiting for them and they are waiting for you’.

“Having visited so many schools in so many countries across the globe, you have clearly had a unique insight into the lives of thousands of children from so many backgrounds and cultures.

“I wonder, on your travels making these portraits, can you recall where you experienced the greatest vibe of happiness?”

Julian replied:

“Well, that isn’t an easy question…

“Firstly, I found mostly happy, interesting kids everywhere I went, as well as a few surly difficult ones. I enjoyed every country too, although I did find Saudi Arabia and Qatar more difficult to acclimatise to.

“I guess you are really referring to a vibe coming from the pupils but I can’t avoid my response being coloured by the vibe that I was getting not simply from them, but from being in their country, experiencing their culture beyond the classrooms.

“On that basis, I was probably most deeply affected by experiences in Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Yemen — all extraordinary places with particularly friendly and, let’s not pretend otherwise, very poor people, without access to the consumerism that defines our (or any) modern economy.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if I was seduced by the idea of this kind of innocence of materialism — lets face it, in a way this is one of the themes of For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness isn’t it?”

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, UK

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

 

Julian continues:

“Nevertheless, to try and give you an example of a happiness vibe moment…

“In Ethiopia, because of the rain and mud, I had to abandon my truck, lights, generator and walk two miles to a village primary school.

“It was a beautiful walk past open countryside and occasional round wooden houses with thatched roofs, no electricity or running water. The few people I saw smiled and waved.

“It was quiet, tranquil even, just the sound of the birds and the light breeze in the trees. The school was crowded with kids (so they must have come from far and wide) and it was missing at least two teachers that day.

“Some pupils had notebooks and pens but most didn’t. The teaching was obviously basic. There were just a few textbooks. No desks or tables, just benches and a blackboard, mud floor and walls.

“I photographed every class, two in lessons and the other three outside because every class was desperate to be photographed. They took it very seriously and were very proud.

“At the end of the morning (a different crowd of kids arrived for the afternoon session) I walked back along the track with several pupils, each of them eager to show off their handwriting before peeling off at various points on the track to follow their own particular paths home.

“They told me that if and when they graduated to secondary school they would walk 9 miles there and 9 miles back, not a prospect that bothered them in the least — in fact, they were looking forward to it.

“That afternoon I visited that secondary school and made a portrait of a Grade 12 Physics class with at least 70 pupils, several of whom had gone to the aforementioned primary and would shortly be embarking on that long walk home.

“The lesson was on the First Law of Thermodynamics — way over my head. The teacher was amazing, dressed in a sparkling white lab coat, passionate about his subject and very proud of his pupils.

“I was moved, overwhelmed by the vibe created by a room full of young people with such enthusiasm to learn.”

 

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Taiwan

Julian pores over a print of a Taiwanese class…

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Taiwan

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

The Book…

 

As well as the exhibition, I also prepared the photographs for the 208 page book Classroom Portraits published by Prestel.

In addition to the photographs, the reader is treated to a foreword by Dr. Leonid Llyushin, Professor of Pedagogy at St. Petersburg State University along with a preface by Julian.

A truly stunning, engaging publication and an essential addition to any photo book collection…

 

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Prestel

Checking proofs in the studio…

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Prestel

With the work completed, my signed book arrives…

The Exhibition…

 

The exhibition of 140 prints is running at the Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam, until 2nd September.

Apr 132012
 

In the (organised and structured) maelstrom of 2012, my studio has seen some beautiful happenings.  Now I’m enjoying a moment or two’s respite in which to begin sharing some of them with you.

Back in November 2011 (I can’t believe it was that long ago!) I wrote about my involvement with the second edition of Julian Germain’s book, ‘For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness’.

Well, a week or two ago, Julian kindly gave me a copy to thank me for my efforts.  A well-received thank you, too, as I simply love his work.

Anyway, I thought I’d share these photographs with you — perhaps to whet your appetite and encourage you to buy one for yourself while you still can…

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness, Second Edition, Jack Lowe

The beautiful linen designed by Julian Germain and Why Not Associates

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness, Second Edition, Jack Lowe

In the production of the second edition, a hitherto unseen portrait was added on the final page.

I have to confess, I was so pleased with this as it enabled me to post-produce one of the photographs from start to finish — something I wasn’t able to do in the first edition, which was in production before we first met.

I feel extremely proud to have had my first major involvement in one of Julian’s fine publications.  It really is the cherry on the cake to see my name credited in the back alongside the likes of David Ellis and Michael Mack…

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness, Second Edition, Jack Lowe

I'm proud to have made the first scan of this image, which only appears in the 2nd Edition

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness, Second Edition, Jack Lowe Credit

 

Nov 252011
 

As is my way, I tend to keep notes to some degree on just about everything I do.  An aide-mémoire perhaps or sometimes through sheer necessity.  On other occasions, simply out of interest.

Falling into the latter category, I am happy to tell you that I met Julian Germain on 17th December 2004, nearly seven years ago.

Julian was just preparing for the launch of the first edition of his book “For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness”—a portrait of an elderly gentleman, Charles Snelling—and the launch of his accompanying show at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts.

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness

Published by steidlMACK, this first edition has long sold out and copies now sell online for hundreds of pounds.

That’s not just a throw away statement, by the way.  I’ve just typed “Julian Germain” into eBay and there are several results. One of them is for this very book: “Buy it Now for $700″ reads the caption…

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness

Charlie in his Robin Reliant

Our first meeting in 2004 was ‘after the event’ on the post-production side, so it was a great honour to work with Julian on the second edition of this beautiful publication.

I reworked old files and made some new scans too, providing fresh CMYK files and proofs in readiness for printing the second edition.

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness

The book, now published by MACK, was launched at this year’s Paris Photo Fair. Sales were handled via the Steidl stand and I’m very pleased to report that it was their second bestseller at the fair.

“Second best? What was first?”, I hear you ask. William Eggleston’s “Chromes”, comes the reply!

You can buy the second edition of “For Every Minute…” directly through MACK for £30.

My suggestion? Grab it while you can…

Julian Germain, For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness

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