Sep 242011
 

One day all too soon, we’ll look back at the styles that fashioned photography (both still and moving) in and around ‘The Noughties’.

It’s my guess that the phenomenon known as drop-focus, tilt and shift or perspective control will be seen as one of the main signifiers of the current era.

The Waterfall Project by Olivo Barbieri is a classic contemporary example.

Implemented well, this is an approach I happen to like; I enjoy the feel of the model village often achieved with this method of capture.

For me, at least, it tugs at the childhood heartstrings and seems to instil utopian, feel-good emotions.

So, I thought you might like to share in this particularly fine example—a French ad made to celebrate their improvements and progress on the railways over recent years:

RESEAU FERRE DE FRANCE from W & CIE on Vimeo.

If you fancy seeing big cameras strapped to the front of trains,  a bit of green screening (and your French is up to scratch), you might like to see this ‘making of’ video too…

RÉSEAU FERRÉ DE FRANCE – MAKING OF from W & CIE on Vimeo.

Mar 122011
 

I enjoyed this short movie created by Jonathan de Villiers and hosted by one of my favourite sites, NOWNESS, on Japan’s Keirin speed racers.

As the accompanying article describes:

“A gladiatorial incarnation of track cycling that dates back to 1948, the Japanese sporting phenomenon operates by an intricate set of rules that sees competitors jostling for position on steeply banked tracks at lightning fast speeds, all but encouraging spectacular crashes…

The state-run industry amasses tens of billions of dollars in gambling revenue each year.”

Keirin: Speed Racers on Nowness.com.

Feb 132011
 

Although this clip has recently appeared at the end of my Alternative Negative post, I feel it deserves a more prominent position as a ‘Weekend Video’.

Regular visitors will perhaps have noticed my appreciation for the paraphernalia of photography along with its processes, old and new.

So, another example to savour over a Sunday morning coffee, “The Dying Art of the Photographic Darkroom” (followed by a question mark in my post title as I happen to feel there’s actually an emerging renaissance knocking at the door).

Very little compares to the gentle sound of slooshing chemicals in a peaceful darkroom…

%d bloggers like this: