Sep 192013
 

This year, the Bupa Great North Run was a two-pronged affair for me…

Firstly, I ran it (see my blog post Great North Humanity). Secondly, I made a series of one metre high prints for designer and illustrator Daisy de Villeneuve and Great North Run Culture 2013.

Daisy de Villeneuve with Run Colour Run at the Laing Art Gallery, printed by Jack Lowe Studio

Daisy de Villeneuve with ‘Run Colour Run’ at the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne (Photograph © Colin Davison)

Best known for her eye-catching designs for the likes of the V&A, Nike, Moët & Chandon and Topshop, Daisy created a series of portraits in her distinctive colourful style for the commission, entitled Run Colour Run.

Daisy writes:

“What I saw when I went to the Great North Run was there were a lot of people, it was very visual. I went around with my camera and I took photos of anyone I thought looked interesting. So, I’ve taken pictures of a whole range of people – not just the athletes and participants, but the hospitality staff, security, the Red Arrows, event organisers, people with their families, kids cheering on their dads, people in costumes, different characters that stood out to me. A lot of these will show up in my portraits.”

Daisy de Villeneuve, 'Run Dad'

‘Run Dad!’ by Daisy de Villeneuve

From her Paris studio, Daisy discusses the project further:

Recently, top international athletes Ryan Bailey and Josh Cassidy came face-to-face with their portraits, now showing at the Laing Art Gallery here in Newcastle upon Tyne:

Ryan Bailey with Run Colour Run at the Laing Art Gallery

Ryan Bailey (Photograph © North News & Pictures)

Top international athletes come face to face with themselves at 'Run Colour Run' portrait exhibition at The Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle

L-R: Great Nort Run Culture Director Beth Bate, US track and field sprinter Ryan Bailey, Canadian Paralympian Josh Cassidy, Daisy de Villeneuve (Photograph © North News & Pictures)

May 082013
 

Fresh from his flight across The Pond, I had the pleasure of meeting the street artist Yis “NoseGo” Goodwin in my studio yesterday.

As recently described in the Huffington Post, Goodwin creates playful, energetic totemic imagery of animal characters born from his imagination.

NoseGo's The Marvelous Clash with Unit 44 Gallery

Goodwin is working with Unit 44 Gallery here in Hoults Yard, gearing up towards a solo show opening this Friday 10th May entitled The Marvelous Clash.

I’ve known Danny Hughes and Steven Dunn at Unit 44 Gallery for some time now — Goodwin’s work has provided a great opportunity for us to collaborate together for the first time in making the editioned Archival Pigment Prints to accompany the show.

Danny kindly describes the editioned prints I’ve made for Unit 44 as, “the most beautifully finished print we have ever released.”

Find out more information on their pricing and availability here.

NoseGo's The Marvelous Clash with Unit 44 Gallery

In his latest blog post, Danny recalls a conversation with Goodwin over breakfast:

“He [NoseGo] described the totem composition of a number of his paintings, comprised of multiple layers, each distinguishable, separate however contributing to the over all form of the character. He referred to peoples experiences, lessons, and memories good or bad that make up who we are. He then went on to describe the somewhat ‘random’ composition of style, character, and look of the artworks. The result in this made absolute sense. He described the childhood toy box filled with all kinds of gems, figures, characters, animals, action heroes, vehicles etc. He then described that back then there was no constant ‘style’ in which you would arrange and play with your toys – this being the ‘marvelous clash’.”

NoseGo's The Marvelous Clash with Unit 44 Gallery

Finally, I’ve always been fond of the photographic eye of the inimitable David Bilbrough.

David popped into the studio last week to capture the print production process. Along with Unit 44, he’s kindly allowed me to share some of his observations with you here…

Production of NoseGo print editions at Jack Lowe Studio in conjunction with Unit 44 Gallery

Production of NoseGo print editions at Jack Lowe Studio in conjunction with Unit 44 Gallery

Production of NoseGo print editions at Jack Lowe Studio in conjunction with Unit 44 Gallery

Production of NoseGo print editions at Jack Lowe Studio in conjunction with Unit 44 Gallery

Production of NoseGo print editions at Jack Lowe Studio in conjunction with Unit 44 Gallery

If you’d like me to make prints for you, please feel free to contact me.

My latest list of services and prices can be downloaded in PDF format by clicking here.

Apr 232013
 

Three years ago, I wrote a short post on printing a series of Arabian Horses for Tariq Dajani.

I mentioned at the time how special that felt, not least because many of the prints I made for Tariq over the years are now with the Jordanian Royal Family, some members of the ruling families of the UAE and with various other influential people in the Middle East.

So, perhaps you can imagine my eyes lighting up when Tariq mentioned that some more images were on their way to me. Falcons would feature this time for a show in Dubai.

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug), 2011 by Tariq Dajani

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) 2011 © Tariq Dajani 2011

I love Tariq’s approach to photography, using very modern methods to realise photographs with a very traditional feel.

Tariq describes:

“The falcon series was shot over a period of two years from 2011 to 2012. The Peregrine, Gyr and Sakr falcons are all female birds, more aggressive and are bigger than the males.

“They are all prized and valuable hunting birds owned by some very important people, whom I’m not at liberty to mention.”

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) 2011 by Tariq Dajani

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) 2011 © Tariq Dajani 2011

“While the precise origins of falconry are lost in time, the keeping of falcons in the Middle East is as ancient as the emergence of its civilizations and goes back at least 4000 years.

“As with my series on the Arabian horse, this series pays tribute to the traditions and heritage of our region.”

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) 2011 by Tariq Dajani

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) 2011 © Tariq Dajani 2011

The prints I made were huge; most were around 130cm on their longest dimension.

Due to their size, each print more-or-less filled my entire print table, making them many times larger than life. On my way to the studio each morning, I had to remind myself what was waiting beyond the door so as not to get a shock each time!

The beautiful, trusty combination of HP Vivera Pigment Ink and Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm prevailed once more; I thought I’d leave you with some photographs I captured during the printmaking process…

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail 02

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Tariq Dajani, Falconry Print Detail

Print Detail: HP Vivera Pigment Ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

UPDATE: Tariq tells me that the prints look beautiful in situ, which certainly looks to be the case from this photograph he sent me:

Tariq Dajani interviewed by the media during his show in Dubai

Tariq Dajani conducting one of many media interviews at his show in Dubai…

If you’d like me to make prints for you, please feel free to contact me.

My latest list of services and prices can be downloaded in PDF format by clicking here.

Aug 242012
 

In this, our Olympic year, the world has witnessed an extraordinary multi-cultural spectacle in the London Games.

For most, I’m sure, it has been joyous, exciting and fascinating to see so many people from so many diverse walks of life meet for one huge event.

As you may have read earlier in the year, I have had a small part to play in the Olympics too.  However, I have also been working on the culmination of another huge multi-cultural project — Julian Germain’s Classroom Portraits.

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Julian Germain | Classroom Portraits | Kuramo Junior, Nigeria

I have worked with Julian on this project for seven years — scanning and printing some 200 images selected from the 500 or so made.

Largely commissioned by The British Council, this body of work has now become a huge documentation of the world’s youth in their schools around the globe.

Over the last few months, I have really enjoyed preparing many of these photographs for Julian’s major show The Future Is Ours at Nederlands Fotomuseum and for the accompanying book, Classroom Portraits published by Prestel.

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Peru

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Over the years, so many discussions have arisen in the making of these photographs.

In preparing this article, I posed a question to Julian:

“In your preface to the book Classroom Portraits, you describe the seemingly magical moment where ‘you are waiting for them and they are waiting for you’.

“Having visited so many schools in so many countries across the globe, you have clearly had a unique insight into the lives of thousands of children from so many backgrounds and cultures.

“I wonder, on your travels making these portraits, can you recall where you experienced the greatest vibe of happiness?”

Julian replied:

“Well, that isn’t an easy question…

“Firstly, I found mostly happy, interesting kids everywhere I went, as well as a few surly difficult ones. I enjoyed every country too, although I did find Saudi Arabia and Qatar more difficult to acclimatise to.

“I guess you are really referring to a vibe coming from the pupils but I can’t avoid my response being coloured by the vibe that I was getting not simply from them, but from being in their country, experiencing their culture beyond the classrooms.

“On that basis, I was probably most deeply affected by experiences in Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Yemen — all extraordinary places with particularly friendly and, let’s not pretend otherwise, very poor people, without access to the consumerism that defines our (or any) modern economy.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if I was seduced by the idea of this kind of innocence of materialism — lets face it, in a way this is one of the themes of For Every Minute You Are Angry You Lose Sixty Seconds of Happiness isn’t it?”

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, UK

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

 

Julian continues:

“Nevertheless, to try and give you an example of a happiness vibe moment…

“In Ethiopia, because of the rain and mud, I had to abandon my truck, lights, generator and walk two miles to a village primary school.

“It was a beautiful walk past open countryside and occasional round wooden houses with thatched roofs, no electricity or running water. The few people I saw smiled and waved.

“It was quiet, tranquil even, just the sound of the birds and the light breeze in the trees. The school was crowded with kids (so they must have come from far and wide) and it was missing at least two teachers that day.

“Some pupils had notebooks and pens but most didn’t. The teaching was obviously basic. There were just a few textbooks. No desks or tables, just benches and a blackboard, mud floor and walls.

“I photographed every class, two in lessons and the other three outside because every class was desperate to be photographed. They took it very seriously and were very proud.

“At the end of the morning (a different crowd of kids arrived for the afternoon session) I walked back along the track with several pupils, each of them eager to show off their handwriting before peeling off at various points on the track to follow their own particular paths home.

“They told me that if and when they graduated to secondary school they would walk 9 miles there and 9 miles back, not a prospect that bothered them in the least — in fact, they were looking forward to it.

“That afternoon I visited that secondary school and made a portrait of a Grade 12 Physics class with at least 70 pupils, several of whom had gone to the aforementioned primary and would shortly be embarking on that long walk home.

“The lesson was on the First Law of Thermodynamics — way over my head. The teacher was amazing, dressed in a sparkling white lab coat, passionate about his subject and very proud of his pupils.

“I was moved, overwhelmed by the vibe created by a room full of young people with such enthusiasm to learn.”

 

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Nigeria

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Taiwan

Julian pores over a print of a Taiwanese class…

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Taiwan

Print Detail | HP Vivera Pigment Ink | Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm

The Book…

 

As well as the exhibition, I also prepared the photographs for the 208 page book Classroom Portraits published by Prestel.

In addition to the photographs, the reader is treated to a foreword by Dr. Leonid Llyushin, Professor of Pedagogy at St. Petersburg State University along with a preface by Julian.

A truly stunning, engaging publication and an essential addition to any photo book collection…

 

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Prestel

Checking proofs in the studio…

Julian Germain, Classroom Portraits, The Future Is Ours, Prestel

With the work completed, my signed book arrives…

The Exhibition…

 

The exhibition of 140 prints is running at the Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam, until 2nd September.

May 232012
 

After a bit of a blip, there’s a summery feel to the year once more, neatly coinciding with the opening of Paul Kenny’s new show O Hanami at Chris Beetles Fine Photographs.

Paul has been building this body of work since the harsh winter of 2010, as he explains in the show’s catalogue:

I was forced to stick close to home — trips to the beach were out of the question for about a month. This resulted in my field of vision being restricted; I was forced to work with the world around my feet. Teasing some scraps of natural material from under the snow or from the ice in the frozen garden pond, I began making a new body of work.

Printing this show has been a particular treat for me — we’ve worked together for four years now and each time the results of our collaboration simply seem to get better and better.

As with many of my posts these days, the images that follow are photographs I made of the prints themselves.  Hard to believe, perhaps, but true!

All made with the trusty combination of HP Vivera Pigment Ink and Hahnemühle Paper, the three-dimensional quality to Paul’s finished pieces really does need to be seen to be believed.

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Iris Print’

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Foxglove No.3′

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Silver Leaf No.2′

So, why O Hanami? Paul describes:

In the spring of 1999 I travelled to Japan with a grant from the Sasakawa Foundation. While there I witnessed the phenomena of ‘O Hanami’, the festival honouring the brief, fleeting few days that cherry blossom covers the tree before being blown away by the wind.

I saw groups of businessmen sitting under the trees at lunchtime, applauding when the wind showered them with gossamer pink petal ‘snow’. I saw the TV special reports with ‘weather’ maps of the whole country with lines like isobars predicting the bursting out of blossom. The literal translation of O Hanami from the Japanese is ‘flower watching’, the more poetic translation is ‘the celebration of transient beauty’.

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Seeing The Landscape With Honesty No.1′

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Pink Square’

Paul Kenny, O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Print Detail | ‘Forgot-Me-Not Summer’

Paul Kenny signs one of his O Hanami edition prints for Chris Beetles Fine Photographs

Paul signs ‘Seeing The Landscape With Honesty No.1′

O Hanami is at Chris Beetles Fine Photographs in London’s Swallow Street from 29th May to 30th June.

 

 Further Reading:

 

Since publishing this post, two leading industry figures have also written about Paul’s show…

David Anthony Hall was so struck by O Hanami that he has generously dedicated a page of his site to it, which you can read by clicking here.

Wayne Ford has also written a second post about Paul on his unrivalled photography blog.  Here’s an extract:

Throughout this breathtaking series, Kenny demonstrates a powerful connection with the landscape, a relationship through which he creates work of not only outstanding beauty but also emotional richness, that places him at the very forefront of land artists, with works of art that are so distinct they can only be categorised as like that of no other artist.

Read the full post by clicking here.

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